Freedom to Read

Freedom to Read Week 2014 (Feb 23 to Mar 1)

Freedom to Read Week (FTRW) is an annual national event that celebrates intellectual freedom in Canada and raises awareness about the challenges to our freedom to read. EPL and libraries across the country play an important role in protecting your intellectual freedom, ensuring everyone has uncensored access to materials of varying topics, beliefs and opinions.

  FTRW 2014 Event Schedule (sorted by date)

What

Amanda Lindhout
Freedom in Forgiveness

Amanda Lindhout has gained international acclaim for her work supporting development and aid in Somalia - the country where she once spent 460 days as a hostage. Amanda's story of survival in the face of lost hope illustrates the remarkable strength of the human spirit.

Immediately following the speaking engagement, Amanda Lindhout will be signing copies of her book "A House in the Sky".

Read more about Amanda Lindhout

When

Monday, February 24, 2014 | 7:00pm (doors open at 6:30pm)

Where

Centennial Centre for Interdisciplinary Science
Room 1-430
11455 Saskatchewan Drive
University of Alberta Campus

Cost

Free

Register

No registration required.

Share our Facebook event page with your friends - https://www.facebook.com/events/247271552118674/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regular

 

What

Banned Books Cafe

Celebrate Freedom to Read Week by participating in the Banned Books Café. Hear readings from challenged books and join in discussions about censorship and your freedom to read.

When

Monday, February 24 | Tuesday, February 25 | Wednesday, February 26

Where

Idylwylde Branch (Feb. 24 2pm)
8310 88 Ave

Jasper Place Branch (Feb. 24 7pm)
9010 156 St.

Capilano Branch (Feb. 25 2pm)
201 Capilano Mall, 5004 98 Ave

Calder Branch (Feb. 25 7pm)
12522 132 Ave

Castle Downs Branch (Feb. 26 7pm)
106 Lakeside Landing, 15379 Castle Downs Rd

Lois Hole Library (Feb. 26 7pm)
17650 69 Avenue

Riverbend Branch (Feb. 26 7pm)
460 Riverbend Square, Rabbit Hill Road & Terwillegar Drive
 

Cost

Free

Register

Drop In. No registration required.

 

What

Freedom to Listen

Celebrate Freedom to Read Week by listening to music, statements, and instruments that have been considered controversial throughout history.

Warning: may contain explicit content and may not be suitable for young children.

When

Saturday, March 1, 2014 | 3:30pm

Where

Strathcona Branch
8331 104 St.

Cost

Free

Register

Drop in. No registration required.

 

What

Freedom to View

Celebrate Freedom to Read Week by watching a film considered controversial. Warning: contains explicit content and may not be suitable for young children.

What's
Playing

Date TBA @ Whitemud Crossing Branch

  • Film TBA
Cost

Free

Register

Drop In. No registration required.

 

What

Freedom to Create

Celebrate Freedom to Read Week by creating your own artistic masterpiece in our "Free-for-all" art project.

When

Tuesday, February 25, 2014 | 6:30pm & Thursday, February 27, 2014 | 7pm

Where

Mill Woods Branch (Feb. 25)
601 Mill Woods Town Centre, 2331 66 St.
This is a free, fun, hands-on, inclusive, all ages social art experience - stick drawings welcome! Through an art mapping process, you are invited to explore what brought you to Mill Woods? What keeps you here? What do you know about the history of the community? What do you love here? What would you change here?

Idylwylde Branch (Feb. 27)
8310 88 Ave

Cost

Free

Register

Drop In. No registration required.

Intellectual Freedom and EPL

<<< Download EPL's Intellectual Freedom brochure >>>

With over 260,000 Edmontonians enjoying our services regularly, our customers come from a rich mixture of cultures, representing over 36 countries from around the world, each holding a diversity of opinions and beliefs. One of the vital community roles the library plays is to protect the Intellectual Freedom of our many customers, including yours.

"It is the responsibility of libraries to guarantee and facilitate access to all expressions of knowledge and intellectual activity, including those which some elements of society may consider to be unconventional, unpopular, or unacceptable. To this end, libraries shall acquire and make available the widest variety of materials." - Canadian Library Association

EPL strongly supports this statement and supplies a wide range of materials allowing for individuals to use them without obstruction and to develop their own informed opinions and ideas.

 

 

"Intellectual Freedom is the right of every individual to both seek and receive information from all points of view without restriction. It provides for free access to all expressions of ideas through which any and all sides of a question, cause, or movement may be explored. Intellectual freedom encompasses the freedom to hold, receive, and disseminate ideas."

- American Library Association

Challenged materials from around the world

Books, magazines, newspapers and other materials are challenged and banned in Canada and around the world all the time. Each challenge has sought to limit public access to materials in schools, libraries or bookstores.

Take a look at why they were challenged and what the results were.

What will I find at EPL?

Walk into any branch and you'll find a wide range of books, CDs, DVDs and other materials. We don't condemn, endorse or advocate controversial materials on our shelves. Nor do we mark or identify materials to show approval or disapproval of the contents. Why? Because it's your "right to know". It's your right to use these materials freely and to develop your own informed thoughts and opinions.

How does EPL select books and other materials?

All materials at EPL are selected based on the following criteria:

  • Relevance to our community's needs
  • Importance as a historical document or as a current event
  • Relation to the existing collection and other materials on the subject
  • Popularity and local demand

We also take into account the expertise, comprehensive treatment of a subject, clarity and representation of different points of view (including extreme or miniority points of view). >> Complete Collection Development Policy.

What if there are materials in the library I don't like?

If you think we should not have a particular item on our shelves, or that an item should be relocated within the collection, you can request reconsideration of materials by filling out forms available at every branch. All requests from customers are taken seriously and will be answered. If you believe there are better materials available expressing certain viewpoints, you can make suggestions for new items at any branch or on our website.

Need more info? Take a look at EPL's procedure for dealing with citizens' complaints about library materials.

Do my kids have access to all library materials?

Yes, your child's card provides access to all material in our library, however, children under the age of 18 must have permission from their parents or guardians to get a library card. Parents and guardians are the best judge of what their children should or should not read and can regularly review their borrowing activity. We recommend that you have discussions with your children about what is appropriate for them to read, listen, view, and play.

<<< Download EPL's Intellectual Freedom brochure >>>

 

 

“The right to know is a requirement for freedom of thought and conscience; freedom of thought and freedom of expression are necessary conditions for freedom of access to information.”

- International Federation of Library Associations